Author Topic: Terre Haute Indiana Self-defense Training & the Gun Debate: Getting to the Truth  (Read 160 times)

JasonYost

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      For years we've listened to concerned citizens of the United States debate gun laws and the use of rifles in crimes.  And, while it is important to have discussions on matters of social violence and come to localized (thereby effective) means of dealing with violent people (preferably before they become violent), we must all be diligent in preparing ourselves and those we're responsible for in the case we (or they) have to deal with the violent.  This starts with acknowledging the truth about violent crimes.

      If you're to prepare to do your job at work or a test at school, would it make much sense to study something other than what you're being tested on?  Of course not!  You'd be spending your study time on something other than that you'll be tested!  Right?  Well, the same is true of self-defense training.  Many spend time doing things that don't mesh well with the culture of violence they are likely to experience if attacked outside a ring, octagon, or other sports-orientated arena.  This leaves them vulnerable to the realities of combat. . . .  Let's look at some statistics from the FBI:
      1.)  Some 60% of crimes involve a weapon of some sort.  So, while it's nice for some martial arts instructors to tell you to "just run" if someone has a weapon, the reality is if you can't out run that person (and leave behind anyone who was with you when they attacked you) then you can't run from the attacker.  You have to know how to handle those situations.  (Not to mention: If you can run from these types of attackers, why take their martial arts at all?  Couldn't you just take track and field and run from any attacker?  What's the point...?)

      2.)  While AR-15s are under attack, the reality is that more crimes are committed by knife-wielding attackers than these guns.  (And, more people carry a knife than a gun due to its use - in various styles - in workplaces, recreational activities, and self-defense.)  If you aren't learning to effectively use these weapons and learn how to defend against them, will your best be enough for your survival or the survival of those you're with (e.g., your kids, wife, mother, father, friends, etc.)?

      3.)  Just to add to that last point:  Did you know that more murders are committed with hands, feet and fists than rifles?  Many of these incidents deal with multiple attackers, but not all.  You see: People don't fight fair on the street, and their friends don't like to see their friends lose.  (We used to call this "jumping in" and "having a friend's back" when I was young.)  This emphasizes the need to effectively, efficiently and honestly learn to use what you have to defend yourself - in every way possible - against the odds of fairness, rules and regulations.  (If the attacker cared about those things he/she wouldn't attack you.)

      There's nothing worse than taking for granted the principles of self-defense and our condition in relation to those needs.  When we do, we open ourselves up to become victims.  One such assumption is that by banning weapons we make the streets safer.  But, when was the last time you saw a drug dealer care that the drugs they were dealing were illegal?  (By the way, the drug-related deaths exceed the gun homicides and motor vehicle deaths combined!)  My point is that the laws don't stop those willing to violate those laws.  (Heck - it's already illegal to kill people using a weapon outside of self-defense, so why are they doing it anyway?  They don't care about those laws.)

      Here's another such assumption:  I know how to fight from drills and exercises and time in a ring or octagon, yet I have never fought on the street, nor have I fought someone outside my weight class....  Or, how about this one:  I've never trained to defend myself against multiple attackers or attacker(s) with weapons.  You see where I'm going here?

      To make matters worse, there is one punch everyone knows, whether or not they have formal training:  The sucker punch.  If they're serious about doing you harm, they're going to be patient and look for the best opportunity (time, place and means) to harm you.  All you have to do is lose perspective, focus, give into ego and complacency.

      Never Again! Never! be the victim of someone else's stupidity.  Empower yourself and those you're responsible for to life by learning real self-defense.

      « Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 09:54:42 AM by JasonYost »
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      JasonYost

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          You make some big claims about rifles and other things killing more people. But we regulate those things already. Why not AR-15s?

          We do regulate AR-15s and all firearms already.  It doesn't stop the criminals any more than regulating behavior on the street stops people from getting into costly accidents.  Consider this: The National Highway Traffic Safety Commission in 2016 shows over 37,000 people died in vehicle related accidents, as well as nearly two million animals, and injuring 26,000 more people.  That same year the FBI shows that the combined firearm homicides totaled 11,004, and the CDC shows that the combined firearm homicides totaled 12,979.  No one is talking about banning vehicles, yet they kill more people than all firearms combined.

          If we want to honestly deal with the issue of violence in our communities, our communities have to be willing to have an honest conversation about what is going on therein.  And, that conversation has to do with behavior.  Only then will they empower themselves to deal with the issue.

          Behavior is communal.  By that I mean if you travel to different parts of the U.S., or even some individual states, you'll find the communities behave differently.  Their cultures are different.  If you tried to speak to these people about things in one way, shape and form, you'll find that different communities would respond to you differently: Some agreeing with you; some disagreeing; some passionate about the subject; some lackadaisical; some violent in response; some passive. . . . so on and so forth.  Relating to your audience allows you to communicate with them effectively (i.e., listening and speaking - not trying to control them).  And, this is just the beginning. . . .

          Imagine this:  We ban vehicles in order to save all of those lives (disclosed above).  How would your community fair in relation to other communities when it came to food resources?  Jobs?  Income?  Water-supplies?  Clothing?  Housing?  And, if your community had a greater resource of foodstuff, would you feel threatened by those outside communities who had no resource?  What if it were jobs, or money, or housing.... would you feel threatened by those outside your community?  What would you do about it?

          When we talk about violence in our communities, or those outside threats to our communities, we have to look into the behaviors (inside and out) that spawn that violence; then, we have to empower ourselves to life by honestly equipping ourselves to defense.  If history has taught anything on the subject, it's this:  When communities disarm themselves, they sacrifice their lives to the predators waiting to resource them (i.e., seize control of them to take from them all they find value, including but not limited to their lives and their children's lives) - and there are always predators.

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          Isn't that what law enforcement is for?

          I've answered this question in another article, which I'd recommend you read here:
          http://restorationboard.com/medical-wellness-health/self-defense-is-your-responsibility!-just-look-at-these-statistics/
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